Adam Taylor: Gender Variations In Twitter Emojis Explained

By: Adam Taylor People are now using emojis to communicate what they see in their own lives. From shaking their fists at despots to protesting racism, Twitter is being used to share our deep…

Adam Taylor: Gender Variations In Twitter Emojis Explained

By: Adam Taylor

People are now using emojis to communicate what they see in their own lives. From shaking their fists at despots to protesting racism, Twitter is being used to share our deep and vivid emotions with the world. Let’s take a look at this infographic which shows the most frequently used emojis across different demographics.

Being a royal is getting more popular among males and they now use emojis representing what they see as popular in their lives. By far, new parents are the most likely demographic to use emojis of new babies. It’s apparent that moms are eager to show their joy and desire to have more children. The second most used emoji for mothers is a smiley face holding a baby. Emojis of babies have decreased in popularity with use falling from around seven in every one hundred adults to two in every one hundred adults.

Driving across the pond, Scottish and Irish men use emojis representing emblems of their cultures and customs. Take the Gaelic peat tent, for example, which is now popular with Scottish men to represent the wood coming off bog. Because the campsite is bedecked with hermit crabs, Gaelic men can understand the symbolic meaning of this emoji. The Beggar in a Red Shirt used by Scottish men is now a face of the famous work of William Blake, William Blake.

Emojis are a lot more diverse these days, especially with the new face features in the iOS operating system. President Donald Trump is now increasingly popular among emoji users, with his now culturally diverse family of political inflexible strongmen, like Kim Jong Un and Vladimir Putin. Using another political theme, alternative oblivion, President Trump has become a top emoji over the last four years.

People using emojis now use the same emotions expressed by popular celebrities, such as Rihanna, Demi Lovato, Angelina Jolie, and Katy Perry. Among people identifying as primarily LGBTQ, emojis now come with less propaganda and more acceptance.

More from The Daily Caller:

Read more from the Daily Caller on emojis.

Leave a Comment