Canada’s New Brunswick reports outbreak of tick-borne illness

Authorities also say they are investigating suspected cases of hantavirus and injecting steroids, drugs and livestock products Officials in New Brunswick, Canada, have reported cases of a tick-borne disease called CVID-19 as the province…

Canada's New Brunswick reports outbreak of tick-borne illness

Authorities also say they are investigating suspected cases of hantavirus and injecting steroids, drugs and livestock products

Officials in New Brunswick, Canada, have reported cases of a tick-borne disease called CVID-19 as the province prepares for a potential “winter action plan” for the spread of anaplasmosis.

More than 80 cases of the tick-borne illness, which is not generally fatal, have been reported in the province so far this year, public health officials said. In 2016, officials counted 122 cases in the province.

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A team of researchers who have been closely studying samples taken from the microbe expected to occur during the winter are assessing how the organism would react to cold weather. They have begun investigating the suspected cases of hantavirus, injecting steroids, drugs and livestock products.

Anca Nidd, a public health consultant, told the CBC that her team was working with Dr Michael Price, an infectious disease physician, and three other health officials from the province.

“I think it’s also good to note that it’s certainly not a health issue and it’s not a flu or disease issue, it’s more a precautionary measure to prevent it occurring,” said Nidd.

In its report on the cases, the Canadian Centre for Disease Control (CCDC) described the outbreak as an “apparent” CVID-19 outbreak and noted that some of the patients exhibited an unusual, chronic weakness or weakness within their extremities.

In total, the latest count of infections includes 78 cases in New Brunswick, Canada, 15 from P.E.I., three in Nova Scotia, three in Saskatchewan, three in Manitoba, one in British Columbia, one in Newfoundland and Labrador, and five in Ontario.

Dr Jennifer Kelloway, the Provincial Director of Public Health, told the CBC that the total number of infections should be expected to increase.

“It’s unlikely it’s going to completely go away [this year],” said Kelloway. “It’s possible that there could be about another 40 to 50 cases next year.”

Anja Sigmundsson, a health sciences professor at Dalhousie University, told the Globe and Mail that temperatures could potentially increase the tick population in the area and lead to infections.

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