In Slovenia, a living dragon: How the medieval legend found its way into the mountains

Written by Staff Writer Bright and long-tailed, many of the baby dragons found on the Slovenian Alps are the result of popular folk art from the medieval era. The dragon was a popular folk…

In Slovenia, a living dragon: How the medieval legend found its way into the mountains

Written by Staff Writer

Bright and long-tailed, many of the baby dragons found on the Slovenian Alps are the result of popular folk art from the medieval era.

The dragon was a popular folk symbol in the 12th century and, during the Renaissance and Baroque periods, and was used in many messages and poems and in music, naturally.

And whenever possible, pictures of the dragon are used to illustrate messages and poetry.

The co-operative of biologists and natural history museum curators in Slovenia describes their findings as: “the first exhumation of a cradle of the animal emblem.”

Living on the mountains

The dinosaurs had been dead for over 170 million years when the dragons arrived, and their birth can be attributed to the influence of the prehistoric creatures.

“The mountains are saturated with fossils … We’re so far removed from the ocean and, therefore, there are no other organisms to support life in the mountains,” said Dr. Romana Arzakov of the Pula-Maurovi Formation.

“Yet the moon, the stars and the sun are either not evident or they appear very dim. And this creates an ecosystem where life nevertheless persists.”

The Slovenian mountains are split between an undersea continental margin and surrounding rocky peaks. Nature sends its northbound nourishment via a mild maritime layer. Snow fills the cracks and falls in clumps of it on the rocky slopes of the mountains.

Ostrava is historically a center of capitalistic trade. Many of the stones, a vital element of all statues, were brought from the Adriatic coast for the highest architectural accomplishment in the region.

As such, many of the dragons are an indelible example of an influence from Europa.

Reincarnations

And there’s the other hand, too: a historical record of how the dragon found its way into the mountains.

In 1560, there was the need for a hero. The epic story of a valiant English knight, in defending Italy from a gang of mercenaries, had been published.

The character of the brave knight, along with the unofficial anthem, amassed nearly 100,000 copies in days. The plot was embellished, so to speak, by dark elves.

Even though the ‘group of gold-engraved men’ practiced ‘midget wars’, many villagers still wanted the community to believe that the gold had come from nowhere — something that wouldn’t benefit the community any more than a natural phenomenon.

This piqued the interest of the peasants, who literally caved in and pried and cleaned the talismans from the Mountbatten altar by handing them over to priests.

By 1604, a fragment of the original Mongol dragon had become one of the most valuable and important fragments. In short order, its precious aura had been exploited for the benefit of the community by a small group of individuals.

The specific varieties of dragons tend to undergo a different evolutionary path.

In the summer and autumn, adult animals are spotted during sunrise and sunset in the mountain villages. Meanwhile, the calves are found in and around the centers of the valleys, around dams and in small groves. In other cases, the nests are found on dead logs.

Transmission from the past

Measuring up to 1.25 meters in length and 0.25 meters in width, they are made up of a mixture of slender pieces of canvas woven with animal fur.

These were raised in high forest on the exposed mountains and rested on the forest floor, but they now sit in the forest floor of a territory that has become very unstable due to an increasing atmospheric temperature.

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