Toronto allows Uber to operate but ‘unclear’ if it will

Image copyright AFP Image caption Uber is still operating in Toronto, where the majority of the ride-hailing service’s trips take place There has been confusion among users of Uber in Toronto about whether it…

Toronto allows Uber to operate but 'unclear' if it will

Image copyright AFP Image caption Uber is still operating in Toronto, where the majority of the ride-hailing service’s trips take place

There has been confusion among users of Uber in Toronto about whether it will continue operating following the city’s decision to freeze new taxi licences.

The firm claims that it will have to “refine” its service in the wake of the decision.

“Effective immediately,” it said it would have “fewer vehicles on the road and you’ll pay more,” the BBC reports.

Uber said it was not affected by the decision, in which the city said Uber’s surge pricing is “unsustainable”.

Uber has already been the target of protests in the city, with protesters holding placards calling it a “pile of garbage” that should be “destroyed”.

However, the firm insists that it is still operating and that it is working with the city.

A city spokesperson told the BBC on Friday that they had not received any communication from Uber.

A spokesperson from Uber told the BBC that they were “not seeking to interfere in the decision by the city, but want you to understand why there has been confusion”.

“We have several years of service history in Toronto and are the only competitor to traditional taxis available on demand, driving 150,000 people per month on Uber cars,” she said.

“Today’s action will have an adverse impact on ride-hailing consumers in Toronto as we refine our operations going forward.”

She added that the company was “currently operating and trying to get answers from the city” in response to the decision.

Image copyright AFP Image caption Toronto’s mayor says Uber should be subjected to the same strict rules as taxis

Taxis in Toronto, the world’s fifth largest city, have recently been subject to surge pricing, where surge prices increase when demand for a taxi is high, leading to inflated prices.

Toronto Mayor John Tory said he had been “amazed” by the reaction of users and drivers “who resent the more expensive ride-hailing choices which are being forced upon them”.

Mr Tory has proposed that the government give local operators a share of taxi licences bought by foreign firms.

Uber has been criticised for not working with local taxi firms, calling it an “affront to the democratic principles upon which this country was founded”.

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