Weather Channel Chief to Montana: ‘Don’t let the black-and-white glow of this fire ruin your holiday’

The Weather Channel on Thursday published a video which appeared to show prairies of burned trees blowing across the Montana state line, sending up hundreds of acres of flames. In a companion tweet, the…

Weather Channel Chief to Montana: 'Don’t let the black-and-white glow of this fire ruin your holiday'

The Weather Channel on Thursday published a video which appeared to show prairies of burned trees blowing across the Montana state line, sending up hundreds of acres of flames. In a companion tweet, the station suggested the fire had exploded because of years of fire suppression, adding: “If you’re spending the holidays visiting Montana, look out for brush and green grass fueling massive fires. No matter the size, leave lots of room around you.”

If you’re spending the holidays visiting Montana, look out for brush and green grass fueling massive fires. No matter the size, leave lots of room around you. #Wildfire pic.twitter.com/ihqiUhmsDM — The Weather Channel (@weatherchannel) December 6, 2018

The National Weather Service reported earlier this week that the winter and spring months would be the warmest on record. In a tweet about the record heat, the agency wrote: “Sub-arctic air is on the move over the central and eastern United States causing an excessive heat watch for much of the Midwest and much of the mid-Atlantic region.”

The Weather Channel described the scene from the social media post:

In central Montana there were sightings of pines burning in the blaze; one person also took video of firefighters hosing down the ground around the wildfire. https://t.co/dOsoO2L9z7 #MTwx #usa #wxvortex https://t.co/0KZd1YCkgr — The Weather Channel (@weatherchannel) December 6, 2018

Meanwhile, numerous wildfires continued to burn in multiple states. The Tennessee State Forestry Division said on Thursday that one of the largest fires in the state’s history had grown to more than 120,000 acres. And in Colorado, the Interior Fire has burned over 55,000 acres of land, and officials were hoping the wind would slow the blaze by Friday evening. Earlier this week, Gov. John Hickenlooper declared a state of emergency over the fire, which already has resulted in the evacuation of several mountain towns.

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