When pregnancy gets that ‘infomercial’ feel

Peter Boas New York Times Shortly after Meghan Markle, the duchess of Sussex, became pregnant, a British press critic noted, “Every modern woman hopes to see a baby bump, and this was just another…

When pregnancy gets that ‘infomercial’ feel

Peter Boas

New York Times

Shortly after Meghan Markle, the duchess of Sussex, became pregnant, a British press critic noted, “Every modern woman hopes to see a baby bump, and this was just another spike in the media firestorm around Meghan Markle.” The headline, from the Daily Mail, conjured images of happy women in infomercial ads touting their miracle products.

Similar hype followed the announcement of another prominent pregnant woman: Elisabeth Moss, who was named the inaugural global ambassador for Health at Home, an anti-HIV preventative. Her website, TheActualElisabethMoss.com, offered extensive pregnancy advice, along with recipes, and detailed tips for staying healthy on her baby’s arrival date.

Ms. Moss is not alone: Over the past year, there have been more announcements of maternity-related businesses and products than ever before. Meghan Markle, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jessica Simpson, Kate Middleton, Keira Knightley, Alicia Vikander, Emily Blunt, Priyanka Chopra, and plenty of others have puffed up their baby bumps in the media, validating the idea that we are each at the tipping point of life-changing events.

But how much do celebrities really have to do with most of us wanting to take preventive measures against the common cold, vaginal atrophy or prematurity? Do we really need Elisabeth Moss’ example to motivate us to tell our health care providers about HIV?

This article was originally published in The New York Times.

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